What’s in My Fridge?

Taking a look at how we keep our refrigerator stocked and organized

Taking a look at how we keep our refrigerator stocked and organized

Okay, so when I planned out on writing this post, I thought it would absolutely epic. Then, I took a look at my fridge (and this is how it photographed after doing the groceries), I realized, there’s not much to talk about.

Joe and I actually drop by the market and/or grocery store a few times a night, because we would much rather pick up fresh meat and bread for our dinner than keeping a stock of it at home. This attitude is very European of us (Joe’s side!) and the things we keep longest are usually in our pantry.

We consistently have bottles of water, cheese (top shelf, you can hardly see it), and fresh fruit (our snack for the week) but everything else changes depending on what we’re whipping up for dinner.

Taking a look at how we keep our refrigerator stocked and organized Taking a look at how we keep our refrigerator stocked and organized

Our fridge door holds all of our condiments which we always keep a stock of (but we don’t have much of a variety because we like to keep it as simple as possible). However, my little section of Asian condiments throws an ode to my cultural background.

Taking a look at how we keep our refrigerator stocked and organized Taking a look at how we keep our refrigerator stocked and organized

  1. Hoisin sauce – I can put this on everything (Asian-cuisine-wise, at least) and my friends always tease me for it. One of our best buds co-owns a Vietnamese restaurant and he always says that I’ll use up their entire stock of hoisin sauce on my plate
  2. Sesame oil – I actually didn’t have this in my fridge up until recently (my mom brought it over from home when she decided to make us some dumplings)
  3. Fish sauce – Key ingredient for getting some really great flavor in soups
  4. Lemongrass – Always need this for my famous Thai Coconut Shrimp Soup

And so… well, er… there you have it! What do you always have in your fridge?

Onion Tart from ‘A Kitchen in France’ (pg 30)

Onion Tart from A Kitchen in France

Onion Tart from A Kitchen in France

Remember when I first tried out Mimi Thorisson’s A Kitchen in France? Well, over the weekend, my husband and I were stuck on meal ideas so we didn’t hesitate (at all) to open up her book once again to find our next best recipe. It didn’t take much time to flip through the book because once we landed on Mimi’s ‘Onion Tart,’ we knew we had to give it a try.

Read moreOnion Tart from ‘A Kitchen in France’ (pg 30)

Cook. Nourish. Glow. pg 297

Baked Beans from the Cook Nourish Glow recipe book

Baked Beans from the Cook Nourish Glow recipe book

When I found out that I’d be getting my hands on Amelia Freer’s latest book, Cook. Nourish. Glow., I was ecstatic. I remember her oh-so popular Eat. Nourish. Glow. being published only about a year ago and how wonderful it was. I just knew this one would be worth looking at.

Freer emphasizes that weight loss can go hand-in-hand with fresh and flavorful meals. Why does losing weight ever have to be torture? Amelia teaches us that by using the right ingredients, we can dig into a delectable dish and feel great knowing that we ate something wholesome and healthy.

I went for page 297: Homebaked Beans. It uses fresh tomatoes, celery, carrots, and navy beans (just to name a few ingredients) and it was not at all complicated to make. I love how it doesn’t consist of any meat: my best friend is a vegetarian, so it’s always nice to come across a great recipe that I can make for her next visit.

Disclaimer: I received my copy of “Cook. Nourish. Glow.” to review. All opinions are my own.

Baked Beans from the Cook Nourish Glow recipe book Baked Beans from the Cook Nourish Glow recipe book Baked Beans from the Cook Nourish Glow recipe book Baked Beans from the Cook Nourish Glow recipe book Baked Beans from the Cook Nourish Glow recipe book Baked Beans from the Cook Nourish Glow recipe book

White Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies

Homemade Oatmeal Cookies

Usually after dinnertime, I’ll often feel this jolt of excitement and the next thing I know, I’ll be craving my next, best treat. I’m not kidding. I am a walking sweet tooth and my constant dessert cravings can get a little out of hand.

Something’s changed, though. For the past several days I’ve been carrying on without this jolt and have been getting through a number of evenings without eating any dessert. There are many possibilities as to why and I’ve narrowed them down to two: a) My 7-year-old sweet tooth has finally caught up with my actual age or, b) I’m getting tired of my usual “go-to” treats.

Must be option b.

I have, however, had the urge to bake. While I lacked inspiration for my own cravings, I knew that I had all of the ingredients for one of my husband’s personal favorites: chocolate chip oatmeal cookies.

I pulled this recipe from Averie Cooks and as always, my batches came out ooey, gooey, and perfect.

I always love baking for others, but help me find my sweet tooth again! What are some desserts you suggest that I try?

whitechocolatechipoatmealcookies-a whitechocolatechipoatmealcookies-b whitechocolatechipoatmealcookies-c whitechocolatechipoatmealcookies-d whitechocolatechipoatmealcookies-e

‘A Kitchen in France’ pg. 45

Recipe from Kitchen in France

Recipe from Kitchen in France

I have owned my copy of Mimi Thorisson’s A Kitchen in France for a few months now. Usually, I’m one to race through cookbooks, flipping through pages and bookmarking the recipes that I’m most eager to try. With this book, however, I found myself putting off my usual antics. My procrastination can be reasoned with this: I just found the book to be too beautiful. I couldn’t help it, but I needed to keep it safe from any “cooking harm.” And so, I did: I set it on display within my kitchen’s more decorative area (hooray for floating shelves in a small space!) and then moved it over to the living room so it could act as a pretty centerpiece (alongside a marble vase, a tray, and maybe a few flowers here and there).

Finally, I decided it was time to get it dirty (yikes!) and put the book to some culinary use.

Diving into Mimi Thorisson’s recipes is like escaping your usual routine and going off to rural France, only to witness the transformation of fresh ingredients become the most delectable meals. From the very beginning, Mimi tells her readers about her heritage and how it ties in with her love for cooking. We should all be pretty glad that this passion was ingrained in her from day one – pick up a copy of this book, and you’ll know exactly why. (Trust me, you will not be able to resist a single recipe.)

Joe and I decided to go for page 45: Parisian Sole. Generally, we love the flakiness that sole has to offer and we loved how Thorisson poured hers with a decent amount of crème fraîche. The aroma of white wine and heavy cream hung in the air well into our evening and it was hardly anything to complain about.

kitcheninfrancepg45-a kitcheninfrancepg45-b kitcheninfrancepg45-c kitcheninfrancepg45-d